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  First State Tire Recycling & R.-T.E.A. Manufacturing First State Tire Recycling & R.-T.E.A. Manufacturing 1500 278th Lane NE Isanti, MN 55040 First State Tire Recycling and R-T.E.A. Manufacturing provides tire recycling services for the general public, private businesses and government entities throughout the five state area of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, North Dakota and South Dakota. Find out more about recycling your tires below. What kinds of tires are accepted? First State Tire Recycling accepts scrap tires from all passenger vehicles and trucks, and some recreational vehicles, for recycling and re-use. Rims without tires are also accepted.  Where do I bring my tires and/or rims? Tires may be dropped off at our factory office in Isanti When dropping off tires, customers fill out a short form and pay appropriate fees OR Customers may contact our Dispatcher at 434-0578 to arrange for pick up and removal at their site.  What does it cost to drop off my tires and/or rims? Fees for tire drop offs begin at $1.00 per tire and vary based on size, rims, and other conditions. What happens to my tires? All tires that are brought to the factory for disposal are recycled or re-used for a maximum benefit. Scrap tires that are no longer road-worthy are shred in our state-of-the-art facility. The shredded tire material becomes environmentally-friendly Tire Derived Aggregate (TDA) such as R.-T.E.A., a larger-sized tire derived aggregate from our Green Aggregate Fill product line. Civil Engineers used Tire Derived Aggregate, including R.-T.E.A., for "green" construction applications like roadway bedding, embankment support; backfill material for septic systems, basements, and stormwater management; vibration mitigation and other purposes. Learn more about our TDA Products (Green Aggregate Fill):  Download Our Brochure OR Click here.


Kids who were into cars, trucks, and motorcycles had plenty of cool toys to choose from in the 1970s and 1980s. These toys were well built and many moved under their own power. And since so many of these machines were modeled after the ones made famous on TV shows and movies, every kid wanted them. Today, adults nostalgic for their youth are paying big bucks for some of these toys. Here are a dozen vintage wheeled toys worth crawling through the attic for.


Getty Timm Schamberger By Ben Stewart Jun 8, 2016 Kids who were into cars, trucks, and motorcycles had plenty of cool toys to choose from in the 1970s and 1980s. These toys were well built and many moved under their own power. And since so many of these machines were modeled after the ones made famous on TV shows and movies, every kid wanted them. Today, adults nostalgic for their youth are paying big bucks for some of these toys. Here are a dozen vintage wheeled toys worth crawling through the attic for.Advertisement - Continue Reading Below


Getty Timm Schamberger By Ben Stewart Jun 8, 2016 Kids who were into cars, trucks, and motorcycles had plenty of cool toys to choose from in the 1970s and 1980s. These toys were well built and many moved under their own power. And since so many of these machines were modeled after the ones made famous on TV shows and movies, every kid wanted them. Today, adults nostalgic for their youth are paying big bucks for some of these toys. Here are a dozen vintage wheeled toys worth crawling through the attic for.


First State Tire Recycling accepts scrap tires from all passenger vehicles and trucks, and some recreational vehicles, for recycling and re-use. Rims without tires are also accepted. 


Launched in 1980, Stomper 4X4s by Schaper were aimed at young kids swept up in the off-road craze. Powered by a single AA battery, these little trucks cost about $10 new and had a four-wheel drive system that turned squishy paddle tires, one set for inside and one set for the outdoors. They even had headlights that lit up. Stompers produced cool models including Subaru Brats, Dodge Power Wagons, Jeep Honcho pickup trucks and even larger Peterbilt and Kenworth trucks. The bodies of these toys were highly detailed and true to the real machines, which added to the fun.


G.I Joe was the original action figure when it launched in the mid-1960s. But by the 1980s, it needed a re-boot, so Hasbro re-invented the G.I. Joe lineup of toys for 1982 as "The Real American Hero," and the toys got a big boost from the popular G.I. Joe cartoon launched at the same time. The show featured more than 200 vehicles invented for the Joes. One of the most popular was the electric Motorized Battle Tank which used two D-cell batteries and cost $14.99.


The Dukes of Hazzard was one of the first TV shows to launch a full-scale toy marketing blitz. Toy companies produced a staggering number of branded products in the 1970s. From watches to sneakers to big wheel cycles and "walkie talkies," practically everything a kid could wear, ride or play with had a Dukes version. The items that seem to get the big bucks today are from Mego. Mego made not only the action figures but also a full range of cars from the show. Of course the General Lee, the Dukes' 1969 Dodge Charger, was the one on most kids' Christmas list back in 1981. And it was sweet, featuring a roof hatch for Bo and Luke Duke to jump inside for their next adventure. Because as everyone knows, the General Lee's doors were welded shut.


About Rural King Rural King Supply, America’s Farm and Home Department Store, planted its roots in Mattoon, Illinois in 1960. Since that time, Rural King has added over 100 stores in a twelve state area (Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio, Michigan, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Florida, North Carolina, West Virginia and Virginia). The heart of Rural King is the corporate office, distribution center and flagship store, located in its city of origin, Mattoon IL. We welcome visitors, and encourage you to come in and take part in our 50 year tradition by enjoying a free bag of popcorn and cup of coffee on us. Our locations have an outstanding product mix with items such as livestock feed, farm equipment, agricultural parts, lawn mowers, workwear, fashion clothing, housewares and toys. You never know what you will find at your local Rural King and that's why every trip is an adventure. Our friendly staff is dedicated to serving your needs and can help you find whatever you're looking for. We pride ourselves on providing Every Day Low Prices, along with being the industry leader in product knowledge and customer service.


Besides the General Lee, Mego produced more of the coolest toys of the 1970s, including action figures and playsets from the original Planet of the Apes movies. When it comes to cars, the favorite might be their battery-operating Gran Torino from Starsky and Hutch. Action figures from the show (sold separately) could ride inside the Torino as one large motorized wheel underneath the 15-inch long car allowed it to spin and swivel in any direction. And it came with a light on the roof that lit up as well as a barricade, street light, and trash can to replicate a real 70s-style police chase. Not a bad deal for under $12.


Motorcycle stunt riding belonged to Evel Knievel in the 1970s. Knievel was legendary not only for the wild jumps he completed, but the ones that he crashed on, too. When Ideal released a series of Evel Knievel toys from '72-'77, they were red-hot sellers, and the most popular and most valuable of these is the Stunt Cycle. The Stunt Cycle sat in a red launch stand with a handle on one end to crank up the gyro wheel on the back of the cycle. Once fully charged up, the cycle would launch and zoom across your living room or over a jump. It was awesome. Eventually the compnay produced a Dragster, a Chopper, and the Sky Cycle, all of which worked on that gyro platform.


Our locations have an outstanding product mix with items such as livestock feed, farm equipment, agricultural parts, lawn mowers, workwear, fashion clothing, housewares and toys. You never know what you will find at your local Rural King and that's why every trip is an adventure. Our friendly staff is dedicated to serving your needs and can help you find whatever you're looking for.


From 1982 to 1986, car-loving kids around the country were treated to the TV show Knight Rider on Friday nights. It featured a computerized, semi-autonomous, crime-fighting and talking Trans Am known as KITT (Knight Industries Two Thousand). The premise sounds ridiculous today, but that all-new Trans Am was freshly styled for the 1980s—just like its co-star, The Hoff. The show was a huge hit and toys flooded the market. One of the coolest was the Voice Car by Kenner. Push down on the cool vintage blue California license plate and the Voice Car would say six different phrases. It came with a Michael Knight action figure, too.